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Posts tagged ‘tyrell park’

Zooming In

After taking Plaquenil for about six months, I began to notice some really strange visual things—sparkly colors, reversing colors of images. After reporting this to my ophthalmologist, I was scheduled to see a retinal specialist. He did some sort of fancy scans and it was determined I was one of the unlucky few to have Plaquenil deposits around both macula–the site of our most acute vision. Plaquenil was immediately stopped and very slowly some of my vision has returned. However, not enough to use that tiny little view finder on my camera.

I could be frustrated with having to use the pull-out window on my Canon SX 50 but sometimes the results are rather amusing particularly with the zoom feature.

One of our favorite spots is the tertiary treating area at Tyrell Park here in Beaumont. There are long walkways around each containment area, the occasional alligator can be spotted along with hundreds of birds.

This was an avocet on an overcast day and my attempts to get some good closeups. That camera can take photos of the water droplets on a duck from a considerable distance but that doesn’t mean it can tell I want the whole bird in the photo, not just its legs.

Tell me what you think!

Here is my subject.

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First attempt with actual bird parts visualized. I omitted the ones of the just the water.

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And another try.

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so I back up the zoom and find that silly bird again.

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my best effort—and I decided it was going to have be good enough.

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In Search of Goldenrod

turtle204-mWeather in this part of Texas can be and usually is hot and steamy. Sometimes we get a front from the north along with the lovely fragrance of the paper mills. But this past weekend was perfect–temps in low 80’s, low humidity and just a bit of a breeze to keep the mosquitoes away. It was a perfect weekend to be outdoors.

After the dogs had their twice daily trip to the dog park to check out all the other dogs and owners, chase frisbees, tennis balls, and bark at random bicyclists and skateboarders and other disliked dogs, we (sans dogs—they are not good travelers–Toby prefers to drive and Dora needs to alert us to all persons or creatures within her eyesight–and she has excellent eyesight) spent some time at Tyrell Park on the south side of Beaumont.

We were surprised  we had the place mostly to ourselves but enjoyed walking around the ponds. This is the tertiary treatment area for our sewer system; and is filled with water birds, alligators(ddidn’t see any), turtles (we saw two) and frogs (heard them but didn’t see them). Two nice young men were walking their three dogs and I tried to get their portraits (the dogs–not the young men–although they were nice looking but thought husband might have been a tad offended—or maybe not–I took photos of him)

another20purple20flower-mFlowers were blooming in the garden part of the park, but my goal for the day was to capture some great goldenrod photos for an art project I have in mind. It is still in the thinking stage but the photos will wait patiently for me on my smugmug site for the next phase.

You can take a look at the photos here: https://sylviaweirphotos.smugmug.com/Texas/A-day-at-Tyrell-Park-October-2019/i-ZLWdsQb/A

Cat Tail Marsh

This past Sunday was the monthly meeting of the local orchid society held at Tyrrell Park. We decided to go about an hour early so we could explore the marsh area. It is part of the sewage treatment system for the city but has been set up as a waterbird refuge. There are many little walking roads throughout with a map neatly outlining distances. Glen wanted to try out his new lens, discovered the lens mounting broken after just a bit of use so he ran back to collect his other camera.

I walked on and thought I saw something that looked like a lot of foam in the next pond over. On closer inspection it was groups of pelicans all nesting/resting together. They were too far away from any of the roads–and my camera only zooms so far.

Wind was rather cutting and I was happy to crawl back into the truck and head for the meeting. We divided a large orchid and most people there potted up a section–it was a terrestrial orchid-meaning it grows in regular dirt–and some overwinter in northern climes.