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Okra in Bloom


Okra tends to be that vegetable people who do not know how to prepare it properly think of as slimy and nasty.

The first time I had okra was in Augusta Georgia and it was fried—-like a lot of southern food; coated in cornmeal and deep-fried. Along with sausage biscuits before they became a national phenomenon, an instant gustatory delight.

In Texas, I had okra and tomatoes–a variation of stewed tomatoes which is a German staple. And then we threw a few pods sliced onto a pizza—and sometimes slice up one or two into a green salad. The pods grow quickly and in the right weather, pods may need collecting twice a day. I hand-slice them as sometimes they become woody.

I’ve also pickled them and have four jars with the pods marinating in spices and vinegar.

What is most remarkable about okra is its beautiful flower. I didn’t know much about okra until I planted it in my raised garden several years ago. I recognized the similarity to hollyhocks; and then when I read further—to cotton.

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